Vancouver Island | British Columbia | Canada
Alpine
1589m
-1 °c 15 km SE
 
Nordic
1100m
0 °c 24 km SE
Lift Status & Conditions
LODGE
WHISKEY
NORDIC
HAWK

Vancouver Island’s separation from mainland British Columbia by Johnstone and Georgia Straits means that many mammal species common to other parts of the province are not found on the Island. Species such as the Roosevelt elk, the currently-endangered Vancouver Island marmot, the Vancouver Island wolf, and the coastal black-tailed deer are different from their mainland relatives. The park has a large deer population and a significant number of Roosevelt elk while wolves and cougars, though present, are seldom seen. Resident birds include the chestnut-backed chickadee, red-breasted nuthatch, winter wren and kinglet, as well as the gray jay, Steller’s jay and band-tailed pigeon. The park also supports numerous blue grouse, ruffled grouse and a limited number of unique Vancouver Island white-tailed ptarmigan

Marmots

Uniquely Canadian, the Vancouver Island marmot is one of 14 marmot species worldwide and one of the most critically endangered mammals in the world. Found only on Vancouver Island in British Columbia they are easily identified by their unique appearance and differ from other marmot species in behaviour, genetics and ecology.

Bears

Bears are a just a part of alpine life in the summer at Mount Washington. In the spring time, you can often catch a glimpse of them along the Strathcona Parkway eating fresh grass. Please keep the following points in mind at all times regarding bears.

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  • Learn about bears. Understand what their behaviours mean. Know how to react to an encounter or attack.
  • Stay alert! Look for signs of recent bear activity. Work & travel in a group when possible.
  • Do not surprise bears. Warn bears of your presence with noise, talking or wearing a bell.
  • Do not attract bears or reward them with food.
  • Inform others of your plans. Carry 2-way communication devices whenever possible.
  • For more information visit: http://www.bearsmart.com